I wish everyone could have access to Dr. Eva's personal care and attention. The Fatigue Solution is the next best thing—it's one book that should be on every woman's bedside table. Eve, Singer and Actress

 

Chapter 5 – Supercharge Your Sexuality: Supplements for Sexual Vibrancy


Please Note: As with all dietary supplements, some individuals may not tolerate or may be allergic to the ingredients used. Please read the ingredient panel carefully on all products prior to use. If you are pregnant, nursing, under medical supervision/care, or taking other supplements or medications, you should consult your health care professional before using any products on this web site. Cease taking any product and consult your health care professional should you have any negative reactions. These products are not recommended for children without the supervision of a health care professional.

 

Maca



On page 151, I mention "Hot Plants" and Supplements for Sexual Vibrancy. In my experience this is always a very, very popular topic. So, I decided to add some more information for those that want to dig a bit deeper. Here we go:

Maca is called a "natural Viagra" in many reports. I hear great responses from my patients, to the point I decided to sell a version of Maca so I could control its potentcy and efficacy and be sure my patients are getting what I promised. More on that at the end of this section.

The Endocrine Adaptogen!

MacaThe endocrine system is a collection of glands that produce chemical "messengers" called hormones essential for normal bodily functions. A wide variety of physiological processes are carried out unconsciously by these "messengers". Once released they flow directly into the bloodstream and are transported to organs and tissues throughout the entire body.

Scientists and doctors are now finding Maca to be one of the best natural ways to regulate and support endocrine health. This action regulates metabolism, energy levels, growth, sexual development and the sense of well being and attitude.

Maca does not contain hormones itself. Instead it provides a unique set of nutrients that directly fuel the endocrine system and help the glands to produce vital hormones in precise dosages predetermined by one's own body.

So why does Maca make you feel so good?
As an adaptogen, Maca works broadly to contribute to overall well being. It nourishes and calms the nerves with calcium, phosphorus, vitamins B1 and B12 , and fatty acids, all of which work beneficially on the nervous system.

It stimulates the appetite and aids in digestion with calcium, vitamins B1 and B2, B12, and fatty acids. Its phosphorus is a primary building block in the cell fuels Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP) and glucose-6-phosphate (G6P).

At the same time it supports the adrenal glands so they don't have to rely on damaging cortisol to fuel the body. Its sterols, calcium, and vitamin C help build muscle mass and its starches aid in physical endurance. Its alkaloids help the body assimilate all these nutrients just where they are required.

In addition, recent studies of Maca also show:

• Its fiber as well as glucosinolate content show promise in helping combat some cancers.
• Bio-available calcium, in conjunction with its alkaloids, make it an effective bond builder, thus reducing osteomalacia and rickets.
• Some of its fatty acids function as fungicides and local antiseptics, which may aid in overall immunity enhancement.
• Tannins bind and precipitate proteins, which improves the nutritional value of Maca.
• Saponins and terpenoids may aid as a sedative, expectorant, pain reliever, anti-tumoral, and analgesic.
• Effects general and not localized to a specific organ.
• Normalizing action irrespective of the pathological state.

Peruvian Maca Root May Boost Women's Libido

The following article and video was featured on AOL Health (November, 2010).

By Karen Keller

A "women's Viagra" drug selling well in the American market may have just hit American shelves, but in the high-altitude areas of Peru it's long been a women's secret.

Maca root, which resembles a small turnip, is sold in outdoor markets in the South American country. "It increases your sexual drive from 30 percent before to good 90 percent," said Diana Moerbeck, a local, in a report from CNN today. (November 1st, 2010)

Chris Kilham, an American businessman, raked in $5 million last year on sales of the herb in the U.S. under the brand name "Hot Plants for Her." Sales of the drug don't require federal FDA approval, and no scientific evidence exists proving the root spices up a women's sexual experience.

If you ask Kilham, it works. "It might cause Chinese New Year's fireworks in your pants," Kilham, a self-described "medicine hunter" told a CNN reporter. The herbal supplement can be taken as a pill or a powder and sprinkled on cereal or into a smoothie. It's been on the market for about two years, said Abdul Qaiyum, a pharmacist and owner of Merz Apothecary, in Chicago.

As I mention in the book, there is a huge disparity in the quality of Maca on the market. Be sure you read the labels and understand what you are buying before making your purchase.

If you are interested in purchasing my ABADI brand of Maca, please click here.

"Several companies already sell it," said Qaiyum, who specializes in homeopathic medicine. Men and women both have been buying Maca at the Chicago pharmacy for energy and stamina, he said, but sales are higher with women. Qaiyum said he's unsure of its effectiveness and only sells about two packages of the root per month.
Women typically suffer from low sex drive once they hit menopause, and take estrogen and progestin to improve their sexual appetite, he said.


Tribulus



Tribulus terrestris is a herb that has been used in the traditional medicine of China and India for centuries. In the mid-1990s, tribulus terrestris became known in North America after Eastern European Olympic athletes said that taking tribulus helped their performance.

What are the Active Compounds?
The active compounds in tribulus are called steroidal saponins. Two types, called furostanol glycosides and spirostanol glycosides, appear to be involved with the effects of tribulus. These saponins are found primarily in the leaf.

Tribulus

Why Do People Use Tribulus?
Tribulus is most often used for infertility, erectile dysfunction, and low libido. In the last decade, it has become popular to improve sports performance. Tribulus has been marketed these conditions because research performed in Bulgaria and Russia indicates that Tribulus increases levels of the hormones testosterone (by increasing luteinizing hormone), DHEA, and estrogen.

Ginseng

Ginseng is the most famous Chinese herb, and is the most widely recognized plant used in traditional medicine. Various forms have been used in medicine for more than 7000 years. Several species grow around the world, and though some are preferred for specific benefits, all are considered to have similar properties as an effective general rejuvenator.

The name panax is derived from the Greek word panacea meaning, "all healing" and the benefits of ginseng are recognized as such. Ginseng is commonly used as an adaptogen, meaning it normalizes physical functioning depending on what the individual needs (for example, it will lower high blood pressure, but raise low blood pressure).

It is also used to reduce the effects of stress, improve performance, boost energy levels, enhance memory, and stimulate the immune system. Oriental medicine has deemed it a necessary element in all their prescriptions, and regard it as prevention and a cure. It is said to remove both mental and bodily fatigue, treat pulmonary problems, dissolve tumors and reduce the effects of age.

ginsengIt is native to China, Russia, North Korea, Japan, and some areas of North America. It was first cultivated in the United States in the late 1800's. It is difficult to grow and takes 4-6 years to become mature enough to harvest. The roots are called Jin-chen, meaning 'like a man,' in reference to their resemblance to the shape of the human body.

Native North Americans considered it one of their most sacred herbs and add it to many herbal formulas to make them more potent. The roots can live for over 100 years.

It contains vitamins A, B-6 and the mineral Zinc, which aids in the production of thymic hormones, necessary for the functioning of the defense system. The main active ingredients are saponin triterpenoid glycosides called "ginsenosides". These steroid-like ingredients provide the adaptogenic properties that enable it to balance and counter the effects of stress. The glycosides appear to act on the adrenal glands, helping to prevent adrenal hypertrophy and excess corticosteroid production in response to physical,chemical or biological stress.

Studies done in China showed that ginsenosides also increase protein synthesis and activity of neurotransmitters in the brain. The plant is used to restore memory, and enhance concentration and cognitive abilities, which may be impaired by improper blood supply to the brain.

The herb helps to maintain excellent body functions, and has been shown to increase energy, stamina, and help the body resist viral infections and environmental toxins. Research has shown specific effects that support the central nervous system, liver function, lung function and circulatory system.

Animal studies have shown that the extracts stimulate the production of interferons, increase natural killer cell activity, lower cholesterol and decrease triglyceride levels. Men have used the herb to improve sexual function and remedy impotence. It is believed to increase estrogen levels in women and is used to treat menopausal symptoms.
It is also used for diabetes, radiation and chemotherapy protection, colds, chest problems, to aid in sleep, and to stimulate the appetite.

Part used: Whole root. Powdered in capsules, as an ingredient in many herbal formulas, and as a tea.

Common Use: One of the most popular healing herbs used today throughout the world. It increases mental and physical efficiency and resistance to stress and disease. Its adaptogenic qualities help balance the body, depending on the individual's needs. It is known to normalize blood pressure, increase blood circulation and aid in the prevention of heart disease.

Arginine


L-arginine was first isolated in 1886, reportedly from the extract of a lupine ( Lupinus spp.) seedling. Lupinus is a genus in the legume (Fabaceae) plant family.

arginineArginine is a semiessential amino acid; although the body normally makes enough of it, supplementation with additional amounts is sometimes needed. Arginine is found in foods containing protein.

Arginine is a chemical precursor to nitric oxide (a blood vessel-widening agent called a vasodilator). Early evidence suggests that arginine may help treat medical conditions that improve with increased vasodilation. These conditions include chest pain, atherosclerosis (clogged arteries), heart disease or failure, erectile dysfunction, intermittent claudication/peripheral vascular disease, and vascular headaches (headache-inducing blood vessel swelling).

Arginine also triggers the body to make protein and has been studied for healing wounds, bodybuilding, enhancing sperm production, and preventing tissue wasting in people with critical illnesses.

There's some evidence that L-arginine may benefit men with erectile dysfunction. In a 1999 study published in the journal BJU International, for instance, 50 men with erectile dysfunction took either 5 grams of L-arginine per day or a placebo. After six weeks, more men in the L-arginine group showed improvement compared to those taking the placebo.

Like the drug sildenafil citrate (Viagra), L-arginine is thought to enhance the action of nitric oxide and—in turn—relax the muscles surrounding blood vessels supplying the penis. As a result, blood vessels in the penis dilate, increasing blood flow, which may help maintain an erection. The difference in how they work is that Viagra blocks an enzyme called PDE5, which destroys nitric oxide, and L-arginine is used to make nitric oxide. Unlike Viagra, L-arginine is taken on a daily basis for erectile dysfunction.

DHEA

DHEA (dehydroepiandrosterone) is an endogenous hormone (made in the human body), and secreted by the adrenal gland. DHEA serves as precursor to male and female sex hormones (androgens and estrogens). DHEA levels in the body begin to decrease after age 30, and are reported to be low in some people with anorexia, end-stage kidney disease, type 2 diabetes (non-insulin dependent diabetes), AIDS, adrenal insufficiency, and in the critically ill. DHEA levels may also be depleted by a number of drugs, including insulin, corticosteroids, opiates, and danazol.

DHEA

There is sufficient evidence supporting the use of DHEA in the treatment of adrenal insufficiency, depression, induction of labor, and systemic lupus erythematosus.

What is it?
DHEA is a hormone that is naturally made by the human body. It can be made in the laboratory from chemicals found in wild yam and soy. However, the human body cannot make DHEA from these chemicals, so simply eating wild yam or soy will not increase DHEA levels. Don't be misled by wild yam and soy products labeled as "natural DHEA."

DHEA is used for slowing or reversing aging, improving thinking skills in older people, and slowing the progress of Alzheimer's disease.

Athletes and other people use DHEA to increase muscle mass, strength, and energy. But DHEA use is banned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA).

DHEA is also used by men for erectile dysfunction (ED), and by healthy women and women who have low levels of certain hormones to improve well-being and sexuality.

Some people try DHEA to treat systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), weak bones (osteoporosis), multiple sclerosis (MS), low levels of steroid hormones (Addison's disease), depression, schizophrenia, chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), and to slow the progression of Parkinson's disease. It is also used for preventing heart disease, breast cancer, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome.

DHEA is used for weight loss, for decreasing the symptoms of menopause, and for boosting the immune system.

People with HIV sometimes use DHEA to ease depression and fatigue.

Women who have passed menopause sometimes use DHEA inside the vagina for strengthening the walls of the vagina and for increasing bone mineral density.

Like many dietary supplements, DHEA has some quality control problems. Some products labeled to contain DHEA have been found to contain no DHEA at all, while others contained more than the labeled amount.

DHEA is being investigated and may eventually be approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as a prescription drug for treating systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and improving bone mineral density in women with lupus who are taking steroid drugs for treatment. The FDA is still studying the pharmaceutical company's application for approval.

How effective is it? Possibly effective for...

• Schizophrenia. DHEA may be more effective in women than men.
• Improving the appearance of older people's skin. Taking DHEA by mouth seems to increase skin thickness and moisture, and decrease facial "age spots" in elderly men and women.
• Improving ability to achieve an erection in men with sexual dysfunction. But it doesn't seem to be helpful if erectile dysfunction is caused by diabetes or nerve disorders.
• Improving symptoms of lupus (SLE). Taking DHEA by mouth along with conventional treatment may help reduce the number of times symptoms flare up and may allow a reduction in the dose of prescription drugs needed. DHEA may also help SLE symptoms such as muscle ache and mouth ulcers. DHEA also seems to strengthen bones in SLE patients being treated with high-dose steroids (corticosteroids).
• Weak bones (osteoporosis). Taking DHEA by mouth daily seems to improve bone mineral density (BMD) in older women and men with osteoporosis or osteopenia (pre-osteoporosis). DHEA may also increase BMD in young women with the eating disorder called anorexia nervosa.

How does it work?
DHEA is a "parent hormone" produced by the adrenal glands near the kidneys and in the liver. In men, DHEA is also secreted by the testes. It is changed in the body to a hormone called androstenedione. Androstenedione is then changed into the major male and female hormones.

DHEA levels seem to go down as people get older. DHEA levels also seem to be lower in people with certain conditions like depression. Some researchers think that replacing DHEA with supplements might prevent some diseases and conditions.

Are there safety concerns?

DHEA is POSSIBLY SAFE for most people when used for just a few months. It can cause some side effects including acne, hair loss, stomach upset, and high blood pressure. Some women can have changes in menstrual cycle, facial hair growth, and a deeper voice after taking DHEA.

DHEA is POSSIBLY UNSAFE when used in larger amounts and long-term. Do not use DHEA in doses higher than 50-100 mg a day or for a long period of time. Using higher doses or long-term use of DHEA can increase the chance of side effects.

5-HTP

5-Hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) is an amino acid that is the intermediate step between tryptophan and the important brain chemical serotonin. There is a massive amount of evidence that suggests that low serotonin levels are a common consequence of modern living. The lifestyle and dietary practices of many people living in this stress-filled era results in lowered levels of serotonin within the brain. As a result, many people are overweight, crave sugar and other carbohydrates, experience bouts of depression, get frequent headaches, and have vague muscle aches and pain. All of these maladies are correctable by raising brain serotonin levels. The primary therapeutic applications for 5-HTP are low serotonin states as listed below:

Conditions associated with low serotonin levels helped by 5-HTTP:

Depression
Obesity
Carbohydrate craving
Bulimia
Insomnia
Narcolepsy
Sleep apnea
Migraine headaches
Tension headaches
Chronic daily headaches
Premenstrual syndrome
Fibromyalgia

Although 5-HTP may be relatively new to the United States health food industry, it has been available through pharmacies for several years and has been intensely researched for the past three decades. It has been available in several European countries as a medicine since the 1970s.

If you are interested in purchasing my ABADI brand of 5-HTP, please click here.